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HUMAN PHENOTYPE - ANNOTATIONS

The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is downloaded weekly from http://compbio.charite.de/hudson/job/hpo/lastStableBuild/artifact/ontology/release/hp.obo. The file downloaded is considered the "last stable build" available for the ontology. For more about the HPO, view their website at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org/.

Term:Recurrent singultus
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Accession:HP:0100247 term browser browse the term
Definition:A contraction of the diaphragm that repeats several times per minute. In humans, the abrupt rush of air into the lungs causes the epiglottis to close, creating a hic sound. Also known as synchronous diaphragmatic flutter (SDF), or singultus, from the Latin singult, the act of catching one's breath while sobbing. The hiccup is an involuntary action involving a reflex arc.
Comment:A bout of hiccups, in general, resolves itself without intervention, although many home remedies claim to shorten the duration, and medical treatment is occasionally necessary in cases of chronic hiccups. Hiccups are caused by many central and peripheral nervous system disorders, all from injury or irritation to the phrenic and vagus nerves, as well as toxic or metabolic disorders affecting the aforementioned systems. Hiccups often occur after consuming carbonated beverages, alcohol, dry breads, or spicy foods. Prolonged laughter or eating too fast are also known to cause hiccups. Persistent or intractable hiccups may be caused by any condition which irritates or damages the relevant nerves.
Synonyms:exact_synonym: Recurrent hiccough;   Recurrent hiccup;   Recurrent synchronous diaphragmatic flutter
 related_synonym: HICCUPS;   Hiccup
 xref: MESH:D006606;   SNOMEDCT_US:65958008;   UMLS:C0019521;   UMLS:C0744897



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