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A critical role of toll-like receptor 2 in nerve injury-induced spinal cord glial cell activation and pain hypersensitivity.

Authors: Kim, D  Kim, MA  Cho, IH  Kim, MS  Lee, S  Jo, EK  Choi, SY  Park, K  Kim, JS  Akira, S  Na, HS  Oh, SB  Lee, SJ 
Citation: Kim D, etal., J Biol Chem. 2007 May 18;282(20):14975-83. Epub 2007 Mar 13.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:17355971
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.1074/jbc.M607277200

The activation of spinal cord glial cells has been implicated in the development of neuropathic pain upon peripheral nerve injury. The molecular mechanisms underlying glial cell activation, however, have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we found that damaged sensory neurons induce the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric-oxide synthase genes in spinal cord glial cells, which is implicated in the development of neuropathic pain. Studies using primary glial cells isolated from toll-like receptor 2 knock-out mice indicate that damaged sensory neurons activate glial cells via toll-like receptor 2. In addition, behavioral studies using toll-like receptor 2 knock-out mice demonstrate that the expression of toll-like receptor 2 is required for the induction of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia due to spinal nerve axotomy. The nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglia and astrocyte activation is reduced in the toll-like receptor 2 knock-out mice. Similarly, the nerve injury-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression in the spinal cord is also reduced in the toll-like receptor 2 knock-out mice. These data demonstrate that toll-like receptor 2 contributes to the nerve injury-induced spinal cord glial cell activation and subsequent pain hypersensitivity.

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RGD Object Information
RGD ID: 8553059
Created: 2014-05-06
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2014-05-06
Status: ACTIVE



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