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Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 is required for the early formation of granulomas and participates in the resistance of mice to the infection with the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

Authors: Moreira, AP  Campanelli, AP  Cavassani, KA  Souto, JT  Ferreira, BR  Martinez, R  Rossi, MA  Silva, JS 
Citation: Moreira AP, etal., Am J Pathol. 2006 Oct;169(4):1270-81.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:17003484
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.2353/ajpath.2006.060271

The migration of leukocytes to inflammatory sites elicited by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is supposed to be coordinated by cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in recruiting inflammatory cells to lungs of mice infected with P. brasiliensis and in determining the outcome of the disease. Expression of ICAM-1 was up-regulated on T lymphocytes after infection with the fungus, and its expression was dependent on interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-12. Moreover, the absence of ICAM-1 resulted in high susceptibility to the infection and delayed formation of granulomatous lesions. In addition, the absence of ICAM-1 resulted in increased growth and dissemination of fungus, decreased number of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cells, and increased production of interleukin-4 in the inflammatory site. The organization of a granulomatous reaction in mice deficient of ICAM-1 was delayed, starting only on day 60 after infection, whereas in wild-type mice it was complete on day 30 of infection. These data show that ICAM-1 is effectively involved in cellular migration and in the organization of the granulomatous lesion caused by the fungus P. brasiliensis.

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RGD Object Information
RGD ID: 8547589
Created: 2014-02-18
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2014-02-18
Status: ACTIVE



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RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.