Submit Data |  Help |  Video Tutorials |  News |  Publications |  FTP Download |  REST API |  Citing RGD |  Contact   

Kinin B1 receptor antagonists inhibit diabetes-induced hyperalgesia in mice.

Authors: Gabra, BH  Sirois, P 
Citation: Gabra BH and Sirois P, Neuropeptides. 2003 Feb;37(1):36-44.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:12637034

Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1 diabetes) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease associated with vascular permeability changes leading to many complications including nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension and hyperalgesia. The bradykinin B(1) receptors (BKB(1)-R) were recently found to be upregulated alongside the development of type 1 diabetes and to be involved in its complications. Kinins are important mediators of a variety of biological effects including cardiovascular homeostasis, inflammation and nociception. In the present study, we studied the effect of a selective BKB(1)-R agonist desArg(9)-BK (DBK) and two selective receptor antagonists, the R-715 (Ac-Lys-[D-beta Nal(7), Ile(8)] desArg(9)-BK) and the R-954 (Ac-Orn-[Oic(2), alphaMe Phe(5), D-beta Nal(7), Ile(8)] desArg(9)-BK) on diabetic hyperalgesia. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male CD-1 mice via a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200mg/kg, i.p.), one week before the test. Nociception, a measure of hyperalgesia, was assessed using the plantar stimulation (Hargreaves) and the tail-immersion tests. The induction of type 1 diabetes provoked a significant hyperalgesic activity in diabetic mice, causing an 11% decrease in plantar stimulation reaction time and 13% decrease in tail-immersion reaction time, compared to normal mice. Following acute administration of R-715 (100-600 microg/kg, i.p.), or R-954 (50-400 microg/kg, i.p.), the STZ-induced hyperalgesic activity was blocked in a dose-dependent manner and the hot plate and tail-immersion latencies of diabetic mice returned to normal values observed in control healthy mice. In addition, the acute administration of DBK (400 microg/kg, i.p.) significantly potentiated diabetes-induced hyperalgesia, an effect that was totally reversed by R-715 (1.6-2.4 mg/kg, i.p.) and R-954 (0.8-1.2mg/kg, i.p.). These results provide further evidence for the implication of the BKB(1)-R in type 1 diabetic hyperalgesia and suggest a novel approach in the treatment of this complication using the BKB(1)-R antagonists.

Annotation

Disease Annotations
Objects Annotated

Additional Information

 
RGD Object Information
RGD ID: 7241581
Created: 2013-03-12
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2013-03-12
Status: ACTIVE



NHLBI Logo

RGD is funded by grant HL64541 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on behalf of the NIH.