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Multiple berry types prevent N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine-induced esophageal cancer in rats.

Authors: Stoner, GD  Wang, LS  Seguin, C  Rocha, C  Stoner, K  Chiu, S  Kinghorn, AD 
Citation: Stoner GD, etal., Pharm Res. 2010 Jun;27(6):1138-45. Epub 2010 Mar 16.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:20232121
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.1007/s11095-010-0102-1

PURPOSE: The present study compared the ability of different berry types to prevent chemically-induced tumorigenesis in the rat esophagus. We also determined if berries influence the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the serum of carcinogen-treated rats. METHODS: Rats were treated with the carcinogen N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA) for 5 weeks, then placed on diets containing 5% of either black or red raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, noni, acai or wolfberry until the end of the study. The effects of the berries on tumor incidence, multiplicity and size were determined, as well as their effects on the levels of selected inflammatory cytokines in serum. RESULTS: All berry types were about equally effective in inhibiting NMBA-induced tumorigenesis in the rat esophagus. They also reduced the levels of the serum cytokines, interleukin 5 (IL-5) and GRO/KC, the rat homologue for human interleukin-8 (IL-8), and this was associated with increased serum antioxidant capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Seven berry types were about equally capable of inhibiting tumor progression in the rat esophagus in spite of known differences in levels of anthocyanins and ellagitannins. Serum levels of IL-5 and GRO/KC (IL-8) may be predictive of the inhibitory effect of chemopreventive agents on rat esophageal carcinogenesis.

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RGD Object Information
RGD ID: 5134997
Created: 2011-07-07
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2011-07-07
Status: ACTIVE



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