RGD Reference Report - Crystal structures of beta-neurexin 1 and beta-neurexin 2 ectodomains and dynamics of splice insertion sequence 4. - Rat Genome Database

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Crystal structures of beta-neurexin 1 and beta-neurexin 2 ectodomains and dynamics of splice insertion sequence 4.

Authors: Koehnke, J  Jin, X  Trbovic, N  Katsamba, PS  Brasch, J  Ahlsen, G  Scheiffele, P  Honig, B  Palmer AG, 3RD  Shapiro, L 
Citation: Koehnke J, etal., Structure. 2008 Mar;16(3):410-21.
RGD ID: 2314455
Pubmed: PMID:18334216   (View Abstract at PubMed)
PMCID: PMC2750865   (View Article at PubMed Central)
DOI: DOI:10.1016/j.str.2007.12.024   (Journal Full-text)

Presynaptic neurexins (NRXs) bind to postsynaptic neuroligins (NLs) to form Ca(2+)-dependent complexes that bridge neural synapses. beta-NRXs bind NLs through their LNS domains, which contain a single site of alternative splicing (splice site 4) giving rise to two isoforms: +4 and Delta. We present crystal structures of the Delta isoforms of the LNS domains from beta-NRX1 and beta-NRX2, crystallized in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. The Ca(2+)-binding site is disordered in the beta-NRX2 structure, but the 1.7 A beta-NRX1 structure reveals a single Ca(2+) ion, approximately 12 A from the splice insertion site, with one coordinating ligand donated by a glutamic acid from an adjacent beta-NRX1 molecule. NMR studies of beta-NRX1+4 show that the insertion sequence is unstructured, and remains at least partially disordered in complex with NL. These results raise the possibility that beta-NRX insertion sequence 4 may function in roles independent of neuroligin binding.



Gene Ontology Annotations    Click to see Annotation Detail View

Molecular Function

  
Object SymbolSpeciesTermQualifierEvidenceWithNotesSourceOriginal Reference(s)
Nrxn1Ratcalcium ion binding  IDA  RGD 

Objects Annotated

Genes (Rattus norvegicus)
Nrxn1  (neurexin 1)


Additional Information