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Parathyroid hormone stimulates phosphatidylethanolamine hydrolysis by phospholipase D in osteoblastic cells.

Authors: Singh, AT  Frohman, MA  Stern, PH 
Citation: Singh AT, etal., Lipids. 2005 Nov;40(11):1135-40.
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:16459925

Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) stimulate phospholipase D (PLD) activity and PC hydrolysis in UMR-106 osteoblastic cells {Singh, A.T., Kunnel, J.G., Strieleman, P.J., and Stern, P.H. (1999) Parathyroid Hormone (PTH)-(1-34), [Nle8,18,Tyr34]PTH-(3-34) Amide, PTH-(1-31) Amide, and PTH-Related Peptide-(1-34) Stimulate Phosphatidylcholine Hydrolysis in UMR-106 Osteoblastic Cells: Comparison with Effects of Phorbol 12,13-Dibutyrate, Endocrinology 140, 131-137}. The current studies were designed to determine whether ethanolamine-containing phospholipids, and specifically PE, could also be substrates. In cells labeled with 14C-ethanolamine, PTH and PDBu treatment decreased 14C-PE. In cells co-labeled with 3H-choline and 14C-ethanolamine, PTH and PDBu treatment increased both 3H-choline and 14C-ethanolamine release from the cells. Choline and ethanolamine phospholipid hydrolysis was increased within 5 min, and responses were sustained for at least 60 min. Maximal effects were obtained with 10 nM PTH and 50 nM PDBu. Dominant negative PLD1 and PLD2 constructs inhibited the effects of PTH on the phospholipid hydrolysis. The results suggest that both PC and PE are substrates for phospholipase D in UMR-106 osteoblastic cells and could therefore be sources of phospholipid hydrolysis products for downstream signaling in osteoblasts.

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RGD Object Information
RGD ID: 2299904
Created: 2008-08-20
Species: All species
Last Modified: 2008-08-20
Status: ACTIVE



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