RGD Reference Report - Factors mediating the hemodynamic effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in portal hypertensive rats. - Rat Genome Database

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Factors mediating the hemodynamic effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in portal hypertensive rats.

Authors: Muñoz, J  Albillos, A  Pérez-Páramo, M  Rossi, I  Alvarez-Mon, M 
Citation: Muñoz J, etal., Am J Physiol. 1999 Mar;276(3):G687-93. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.1999.276.3.G687.
RGD ID: 14995425
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:10070045
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.1152/ajpgi.1999.276.3.G687

Nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and glucagon have been implicated in promoting the hyperdynamic circulatory state of portal hypertension. Recent evidence also indicates that increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production is involved in the pathogenesis of this hemodynamic abnormality. This study was aimed at investigating in rats with portal vein stenosis (PVS) the effects on splanchnic hemodynamics of blocking circulating TNF-alpha and the factors mediating the vascular action of this cytokine in this setting. Anti-TNF-alpha polyclonal antibodies or placebo was injected into rats (n = 96) before and 4 days after PVS (short-term inhibition) and at 24 h and 4, 7, 10 days after PVS (long-term inhibition). Short-term TNF-alpha inhibition reduced portal venous inflow and cardiac index and increased splanchnic and systemic resistance. Portal pressure was unchanged, but portal-systemic shunting was decreased. After long-term TNF-alpha inhibition, portal venous inflow and portal pressure were unchanged, but arterial pressure and systemic resistance rose significantly. Anti-TNF-alpha PVS rats exhibited lower increments of systemic resistance after Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and indomethacin administration and lower serum levels of TNF-alpha, nitrates-nitrites, and 6-keto-PGF1alpha, both over the short and the long term. Serum glucagon levels rose after long-term inhibition. In conclusion, the specific role played by TNF-alpha in the development of the hyperdynamic state of portal hypertension appears to be mainly mediated through an increased release of nitric oxide and prostacyclin. Maintenance of the splanchnic hyperemia after long-term TNF-alpha inhibition could be due to a compensatory release of glucagon.

Annotation

Disease Annotations    

Objects Annotated

Genes (Rattus norvegicus)
Tnf  (tumor necrosis factor)

Genes (Mus musculus)
Tnf  (tumor necrosis factor)

Genes (Homo sapiens)
TNF  (tumor necrosis factor)


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