RGD Reference Report - Drebrin E is involved in the regulation of axonal growth through actin-myosin interactions. - Rat Genome Database

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Drebrin E is involved in the regulation of axonal growth through actin-myosin interactions.

Authors: Mizui, T  Kojima, N  Yamazaki, H  Katayama, M  Hanamura, K  Shirao, T 
Citation: Mizui T, etal., J Neurochem. 2009 Apr;109(2):611-22. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.05993.x. Epub 2009 Feb 13.
RGD ID: 10395284
Pubmed: (View Article at PubMed) PMID:19222710
DOI: Full-text: DOI:10.1111/j.1471-4159.2009.05993.x

Drebrin is a well-known side-binding protein of F-actin in the brain. Immunohistochemical data suggest that the peripheral parts of growing axons are enriched in the drebrin E isoform and mature axons are not. It has also been observed that drebrin E is concentrated in the growth cones of PC12 cells. These data strongly suggest that drebrin E plays a role in axonal growth during development. In this study, we used primary hippocampal neuronal cultures to analyze the role of drebrin E. Immunocytochemistry showed that within axonal growth cones drebrin E specifically localized to the transitional zone, an area in which dense networks of F-actins and microtubules overlapped. Over-expression of drebrin E caused drebrin E and F-actin to accumulate throughout the growth cone and facilitated axonal growth. In contrast, knockdown of drebrin E reduced drebrin E and F-actin in the growth cone and prevented axonal growth. Furthermore, inhibition of myosin II ATPase masked the promoting effects of drebrin E over-expression on axonal growth. These results suggest that drebrin E plays a role in axonal growth through actin-myosin interactions in the transitional zone of axonal growth cones.

Annotation

Gene Ontology Annotations    

Biological Process

Cellular Component

Objects Annotated

Genes (Rattus norvegicus)
Dbn1  (drebrin 1)


Additional Information